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World Congress on Microbiology and Rare Infectious Diseases, will be organized around the theme “Microbiota: a Microscopic Shield Against COVID-19”

Microbe Infections 2020 is comprised of keynote and speakers sessions on latest cutting edge research designed to offer comprehensive global discussions that address current issues in Microbe Infections 2020

Submit your abstract to any of the mentioned tracks.

Register now for the conference by choosing an appropriate package suitable to you.

Microbiology is the study of microscopic organisms, such as bacteria, viruses, archaea, fungi and protozoa. This discipline includes fundamental research on the biochemistry, physiology, cell biology, ecology, evolution and clinical aspects of microorganisms, including the host response to these agents.

  • Track 1-1Protozoology
  • Track 1-2Phycology/algology
  • Track 1-3Parasitology
  • Track 1-4Immunology
  • Track 1-5Virology
  • Track 1-6Microbial genetics
  • Track 1-7Cellular microbiology
We humans are mostly microbes, over 100 trillion of them. Microbes outnumber our human cells ten to one. The majority live in our gut, particularly in the large intestine The microbiome is the genetic material of all the microbes - bacteria, fungi, protozoa and viruses - that live on and inside the human body. The number of genes in all the microbes in one person’s microbiome is 200 times the number of genes in the human genome. The microbiome may weigh as much as five pounds. The bacteria in the microbiome help digest our food, regulate our immune system, protect against other bacteria that cause disease, and produce vitamins including B vitamins B12, thiamine and riboflavin, and Vitamin K, which is needed for blood coagulation. The microbiome was not generally recognized to exist until the late 1990s.

Infectious disease research has the potential for broad application because everyone, in every area of the world, is infected by microbes at some point in his or her life.

Microbes are simple organisms capable of rapid genetic mutation. Many evolve into new strains that resist available therapies. The ease of international travel and an increasing world population facilitate problems associated with rapid microbial evolution.

Clinicians treat many patients with challenging infections. Investigators and clinicians collaborate to conduct clinical trials that provide patients with access to novel, experimental diagnostics and therapies for life-threatening infections. Investigations include emerging pathogens, novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, gene therapy, antimicrobial resistance, and counter-bioterrorism, such as the rapid test for anthrax.

Irresistible Infections are scatters added about by way of dwelling beings —, for example, microorganisms, infections, growths or parasites. They're mainly innocuous or even supportive, alternatively beneath precise conditions, a few living beings may additionally motive ailment. Some irresistible infections can be exceeded from person to individual.

Infectious diseases are caused by microorganisms such as viruses, bacteria, fungi or parasites and can spread between individuals.

 

 

Viruses are very tiny germs. They are made of genetic material inside of a protein coating. Viruses cause familiar infection diseases such as the common cold, flu and warts. They also cause severe illnesses such as HIV/AIDS, smallpox, and Ebola.

Viruses are like hijackers. They invade living, normal cells and use those cells to multiply and produce other viruses like themselves. This can kill, damage, or change the cells and make you sick. Different viruses attack certain cells in your body such as your liver, respiratory system, or blood.

When you get a virus, you may not always get sick from it. Your immune system may be able to fight it off.

For most viral infections, treatments can only help with symptoms while you wait for your immune system to fight off the virus. Antibiotics do not work for viral infections. There are antiviral medicines to treat some viral infections. Vaccines can help prevent you from getting many viral diseases.

 

  • Track 5-1Coronavirus (COVID-19)

A bacterial infection is a proliferation of a harmful strain of bacteria on or inside the body. Bacteria can infect any area of the body. Pneumonia, meningitis, and food poisoning are just a few illnesses that may be caused by harmful bacteria. Bacteria come in three basic shapes: rod-shaped (bacilli), spherical (cocci), or helical (spirilla). Bacteria may also be classified as gram-positive or gram-negative. Gram-positive bacteria have a thick cell wall while gram-negative bacteria do not. Gram staining, bacterial culture with antibiotic sensitivity determination, and other tests are used to identify bacterial strains and help determine the appropriate course of treatment.

  • Track 6-1Bacterial Skin Infections
  • Track 6-2Foodborne Bacterial Infections
  • Track 6-3Sexually Transmitted Bacterial Infections

Fungal infections are common throughout much of the natural world. In humans, fungal infections occur when an invading fungus takes over an area of the body and is too much for the immune system to handle.

Fungi can live in the air, soil, water, and plants. There are also some fungi that live naturally in the human body.

 

The symptoms of a fungal infection will depend on the type, but common symptoms include the following:

Skin changes, including red and possibly cracking or peeling skin

Itching

 

 

Parasites are organisms that live off other organisms, or hosts, to survive. Some parasites don’t noticeably affect their hosts. Others grow, reproduce, or invade organ systems that make their hosts sick, resulting in a parasitic infection.

Parasitic infections are a big problem in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Malaria is one of the deadliest parasitic diseases.

The investigation of parasitic ailments is known as parasitology

  • Track 8-1Trichomoniasis
  • Track 8-2Giardiasis
  • Track 8-3Cryptosporidiosis

Rapid identification of microorganisms in the clinical microbiology can be of great value for selection of optimal patient management strategies for infections caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi, mycobacteria, and parasites. Rapid identification of microorganisms in clinical samples enables expedient de-escalation from broad-spectrum agents to targeted antimicrobial therapy. The switch to tailored therapy minimizes risks of antibiotics, namely, disruption of normal flora, toxic side effects, and selective pressure. There is a critical need for new technologies in clinical microbiology, particularly for bloodstream infections, in which associated mortality is among the highest of all infections. Just as importantly, there is a need for the clinical laboratory community to embrace the practices of evidence-based interventional laboratory medicine and collaborate in translational research projects to establish the clinical utility, cost benefit, and impact of new technologies.

 

The emergence of antimicrobial resistance poses a serious challenge to health care practitioners. Management and control of multidrug-resistant organisms should include good infection control practices, good antimicrobial stewardship programs and novel antimicrobials with new mechanisms of action.

 

Antimicrobial resistance grows as strains of bacteria that carry and exchange resistance genes spread throughout a population or region. Knowledge of resistance in bacteria from prior infections thus helps to target both treatment of new infections and efforts to contain resistance locally and globally as information about recent infections can anticipate antimicrobial resistance in new situations. Tens of thousands of clinical and basic research laboratories throughout the world generate resistance data. But very few labs submit these data to appropriate databases that could allow local analysis or linking with a surveillance network.